Malaga: more than Costa del Sol

Malaga: Alcazaba, Cathedral, and Museum of Malaga

Before reading about the region in preparation for our trip to Andalusia, I thought that Malaga was mainly known for its beaches (Costa del Sol). I realize now that Malaga has to offer quite a bit more than that, like the Cathedral, Alcazaba, and Gibralfaro. Also, just wandering through the streets of Malaga is a real treat. Around every corner there is a church, a square, a park, an alley that needs exploring. In the area around the Alcazaba Roman, Arabic, and Renaissance architecture meet each other. Very inspirational. Furthermore, the early darkness of the warm evenings invites for late dining outside. The food is excellent.

Roman Theatre
Discovered only in 1951 the Roman Theatre is now one of the important tourist attractions of Malaga. It was built in the 1st century and is still used for special types of shows. On the square in front of the Roman Theatre there is always live music attracting a lot of people. Very nice atmosphere.

Roman Theater by night

Alcazaba
The Alcazaba fortress palace was built in the 11th century by the Moors, partly with material from the Roman Theatre right next to it. It is situated against the Gibralfaro mountain and was later surrounded by the defence walls of Gibralfaro Castle.

Alcazaba and Roman Theatre

Gibralfaro Castle
The Gibralfaro Castle is named after the mountain it is built on. It dates back as far as the 14th century. From the walls you have spectacular views over the city, the harbour, and the sea. It was quite a climb to take this picture.

Malaga from Gibralfaro

Cathedral of Malaga
The Cathedral was built in Renaissance style within the limits of old Moorish walls. It was suppose to have two towers. However, after the first tower was finished there was no money left to build the second tower. Here some pictures of the cathedral on the outside accepted by Dreamstime.

 

We really enjoyed Malaga. Of course we went to one of the beaches (El Palo) to take a swim. However, most of the time we spent on exploring the city beyond the obvious tourist attractions. What struck us most, was that around every corner there is a church and that every hour of the day somebody gets married. Malaga is definitely more than just Costa del Sol.

Stock Images

Preparing for trip to Andalusia

My wife visited Andalusia, together with members of the family, several times. When she came back from her last visit, she told me that she had decided that we should go together so I could take the pictures she had in mind, but could not take. So, we decided to make a roundtrip:

 

We spent two days deciding on the dates, booking the hotels/apartments, and making reservations for important attractions, such as Alhambra. I used Sygic Travel, both app and webservice, to schedule everything, including our daily trips. To register the GPS locations while taking pictures I will use Komoot. Furthermore, we decided to take the Alsa busses from city to city. Very convenient. Within the cities we would either walk or take a taxi.

In the meantime, I started to read more about the region and about the Moresque influences in Spain in general and in Andalusia in particular. I first read a book about a Moor that copied important books in Cordoba (De Kopiist by Hanny Alders, in Dutch), followed by The Hand of Fatima by Ildefonso Falcones. Both books give a good impression of the ruling of the Arabs in Spain, and the influences on culture and architecture, and the fights between the Roman Catholic and Islam religions.

From a photography perspective I had to decide what to take. Because we traveled by airplane and busses, it means we have to travel light. The topic of my pictures would be buildings, both indoor and outdoor, details, like tiles or plants, aerial view of cities, night shots.

So I decided to take:

  • Nikon D800 and iPhone (!) as cameras (iPhone X is doing a pretty good job and weights almost nothing)
  • Nikon 18-300 mm lens, general-purpose lens
  • Nikon 16-35 mm lens, for architectural pictures
  • A small tripod, for night shots
  • Colorspace UDMA 2, to store pictures
  • Peak Design Capture, to carry the D800 on the strap of my backpack
  • Peak Design Field pouch, to carry smaller stuff like a polaroid filter
  • Peak Design Range pouch, to carry an extra lens on my belt in case I am not allowed to take my backpack inside a tourist attraction (like Alhambra)
  • Peak Design straps, to carry my camera or Range pouch
  • Arsenal, the smart camera assistant, to help me with difficult pictures
  • Peak Design Everyday Backpack 20L, to carry all of the above.

In the upcoming posts I will keep you up-to-date about my photography trip to Andalusia.