Pictures in the press

Aimee@COMMIT
Aimee@COMMIT
Aimee@Photoshoot
Aimee@Photoshoot

In my spare time I am a photographer. My regular job is being a professor in Computer Science at a research university. On some occasions I can combine these two activities. With, I think, very nice results.
As a researcher I am co-director of a large national research project called COMMIT with over 200 people participating coming from various universities, academic institutes, and companies. During its meetings the participants  give presentations, give demos, talk to each other, and have fun. I enjoy taking pictures of the participants during these events. They are so passionate about what they are doing. It is nice to capture that passion. There is no posing, no directing models, no rehearsals. It is capturing real time events, just like in journalistic photography.
I share the pictures with my colleagues via a password-protected album on my own NAS. Some of my colleagues give interviews for newspapers, magazines, websites etc. For these interviews they quite often use pictures of themselves taken by me. I feel very proud about that. 
Here you will find an article about Aimee that includes the above two pictures. In the first one she is on stage giving a presentation on Ethics in ICT for the COMMIT community. The second one is taken during a photoshoot in the Design Lab at my university, faking an interview. She is also one of the founders of the Responsible Robotics Foundation. We got to know each other when she was a PhD student with the ambition to become an ethics advisor. Now she is a high potential researcher in that area. 
I enjoy journalistic photography and I hope more of my pictures will appear in the press in the near future.

Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu
Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu is an icon of the Inca culture. It was built around 1450 for one of the Inca emperors and abandoned a century later during the Spanish Conquest. Hiram Bingham rediscovered it in 1911. The place was so secluded that only local people knew about it. And now it is one of the New Seven Wonders of the World.
In 1982 it was the first time I visited Machu Picchu. Since then I have been there 4 or 5 times. Last time was the summer of 2015. It is a remarkable site that is worth visiting over and over again. Walking around, is like walking through a village where different sections have different functions. 
Taking pictures is not easy. First of all, there are quite a few tourists visiting the site the whole day through. So, taking pictures without tourists is next to impossible. Also, you have to be lucky with the weather. Friends of mine were unlucky: fog and quite a bit of rain. As you can see I was pretty lucky: blue sky and partly cloudy, the same as the first time I was there.
The site is really impressive: the way it was built (look at the bricks), the irrigation system to water the terraces, the storage of the food, the calendar, and the housing. The site itself is at roughly 2400 meters. As you can see it is surrounded by high mountains. So, it is not surprising it took quite a while before it was discovered again. Now it is a world famous tourist attraction, definitely worth visiting.
Here you can see my album of pictures on Machu Picchu.
Machu Picchu and Huayna Picchu
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

Stock Images

Sunset at Domburg

Domburg is a tiny village along the coast in the province Zeeland in the Netherlands. I had been there when I was young. My family decided to pay this touristic village a visit again. It was very nice weather. So, we had ample opportunity to have long hikes on the beach. 
To make sure that the sand of the beach does not disappear they have built breakers.  These are two rows of wooden poles from the coast into the sea, covering the area between high and low tide. These are fascinating objects to take pictures of, because of the water curling around the poles and the seagulls taking a rest.

Breakers at Domburg
Breakers at Domburg

Breakers at Domburg
Breakers at Domburg

Around 7 pm it was high tide; around the same time we also enjoyed a beautiful sunset. The interaction between the remaining light of the sun, its reflection on the water,  and the incoming waves of the upcoming tide were really magnificent.
Sunset at Domburg
Sunset at Domburg

 I had taken my regular lens: Nikkor 28 – 300mm lens. To make sure that I had full control over the exposure I shot in manual mode: shutter speed 1/320th of a second (to avoid a tripod and fix the waves) and aperture f/9. The under-exposure was compensated by an automatic increase of the ISO. Looking back now an aperture of f/11 would have been better (larger depth of field).
Here are some more pictures of the beautiful sunset in Domburg. Enjoy!