Two cities in one weekend: Frankfurt and Wiesbaden

Frankfurt am Main


 
On Saturday I visited Frankfurt. I took the regional train from Wiesbaden, where we stayed overnight, to Frankfurt. From Frankfurt Hauptbahnhof I walked via the Willy Brandt Platz to the famous Eiserner Steg, an iron bridge for pedestrians, crossing the river Main. From there you can see on the one side the Church of the Three Kings and on the other side the mixture of high-rise office buildings next to the old city center. 

Church of Three Kings
View from Eiserner Steg

Then I walked to Römerberg (Roman Mountain), the Town Hall square. Here you see all the old buildings. This square being the center dates back to the Middle Ages. The place was crowded, so it was not easy to take nice pictures. Below some impressions.

The next stop, before going back to the train station, was the Alte Oper, the former opera building, which is now used as music hall. As you can see, people were really enjoying the perfect weather.

Alter Oper

Here you can see all the pictures of Frankfurt accepted by Dreamstime.

Wiesbaden


 
On Sunday I made a tour through Wiesbaden. Via a park with a small pond in the river Salzbach I went to the Marktkirche and the Neue Rathaus. 

New Town Hall and Market Church
Kochbrunnenplatz

From there I walked, via Kochbrunnenplatz (above Cafe del Sol with the nice tree), all the way up to the Russian-Orthodox Church on the Neroberg. This was quite a climb. It is one of the oldest Russian-Orthodox churches in West-Europe with its typical architecture with golden onion-shaped domes.

Russian-Orthodox Church

On the way back I passed the Saint Bonifatius church at the Luisenplatz. 

Saint Bonifatius Church

Walking through Wiesbaden was quite enjoyable, all the nice houses, churches, buildings. You can see the richness of the city everywhere.

In most cases I used my 16-35mm lens and used the correction perspective Upright of Lightroom to avoid “diagonal buildings”. 

Here you can see all the pictures of Wiesbaden accepted by Dreamstime.

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Berlin: from Reichstag to Museumsinsel

Dom Church
Dom Church

Last week I spent with my family a weekend in Berlin. The first time I went there was somewhere around 1985. In those days West Berlin was still an enclave in East Germany. Of course, nowadays East and West Germany are united, as is Berlin. Although you can still see the remains of the Wall.
I have taken some pictures along our walk with the only lens I had taken: Nikon 16-35mm. Please open them in a separate window, so you can read the blog and see the pictures at the same time.
We started our walk near the Reichstag, the German Parliament (2). From there, you can also see where the Bundeskanzler resides (1). A nice modern building. Right next to the Reichstag is the Memorial to the Sinti and Roma (3).
From there on we went to the Brandenburger Tor (4-6), a well-known landmark in Germany. It is meant to be a sign of peace. It was situated right next to the Wall, and was prominently visible while the wall was teared down.
The next stop was the Memorial to the Jews murdered in Europe (7-9). The site is covered with 2711 concrete slabs of varying height.
On the way to Potsdamer Platz we saw this interesting building (10). Potsdamer Platz is nowadays a very modern center (11-12). To contrast this there are still remains of the original Wall (13).
On the way to Checkpoint Charlie (17-18; the former pass through between East and West Berlin) we passed the indoor and outdoor exhibition called the Topography of Terror (14-16).
Then we went on to the Gendarmenmarkt with two almost identical churches and the Concert Hall in the middle (19-22).
Via Unter den Linden we walked to the Berliner Dom (Berlin Cathedral) with the Lustgarten in front of it (23-26). After a walk around the Museumsinsel we ended up at the Alte Nationalgalerie (27-30).
Berlin is certainly worthwhile a visit.
Here are the six pictures I submitted to Dreamstime and that were accepted.
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