A Magnificent Sunset at the Beach of Texel

Sunset at the beach of Texel

September last year I visited Texel for the first time. It was for business reasons: Visiting NIOZ, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research. I stayed overnight at Hotel Lindeboom in Den Burg. After visiting Vlieland, Ameland and Terschelling, I was a bit disappointed: the sea was too far away to walk from my hotel to the beach. So, I visited the Oudheidkamer Den Burg, Texel. It makes you realise that even basic healthcare is not trivial on an island.

After discussing my disappointment with friends they suggested us to go to De Koog and to rent a bike. So, in October we took the train to Den Helder (there is really no need to take a car to Texel). From the railway station there a direct bus to the boat and from there another bus to our hotel: Hotel Greenside.

We arrived late in the afternoon. The first thing we did was pick up our bikes and go to the beach. We were just in time for a magnificent sunset (see on top and below). It was a perfect gift after a day traveling.

Sunset at the beach of Texel
Lighthouse of Texel

The next day we visited several places on the island by electric bike. The red lighthouse up north on the island (see on the right), a small village called De Cocksdorp on the Waddenzee-side of the island, for an excellent lunch, and De Slufter, a natural hole in the dunes (see below).

De Slufter is a salt marsh, which is the result of an opening in the dunes. The lower parts get flooded every high tide, only with strong western wind and high tide, also the higher parts get flooded. Below you see the opening in the dunes and the higher and lower parts of the marsh.

De Slufter

After my initial disappointment, I really fell in love with Texel. It is the largest island of the Waddenzee, so please rent an e-bike.

End of WW II: 75 years ago

C.T. Stork square in Tuindorp, Hengelo – Historical Place in Hengelo

This year, 2020, we celebrate the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. For example, on January 27th 1945 the extermination Camp Auschwitz was liberated by the Russians; April 3rd 1945 Hengelo was liberated. All of us have family members or friends that vividly remember what happend in WW II. Everybody agrees that what happened in this war should never happen again.

Kindergarten: green doors on the right

Last year I was contacted by Johanna Lemke about some of my pictures of buildings around the C.T. Stork square. She told me that she went to kindergarten in Tuindorp (Hengelo); this kindergarten is now part of Hotel ‘t Lansink. Shortly after WW II, she, together with the rest of her family, migrated to Canada. Recently she decided to write her memories of that period: an innocent, pre-school child noticing the characteristics of a war and experiencing the behaviour of soldiers.

The book is called: Enemy Under Our Roof written by Johanna M.W.F. Lemke. Below you find the back cover description of the novel:

The novel will be available as of April in Boekhandel Broekhuis in Hengelo, and there is a chance that Johanna Lemke will come to Hengelo to participate in the celebration of liberation of Hengelo (April 3rd, 1945).

Two of my pictures of the C.T. Stork square are included in the novel. It was quite an honour to have email conversations with Johanna Lemke about her upcoming book and to be able to contribute a little bit to the book. As of April I would like to invite you to Boekhandel Broekhuis to get a copy of the novel yourself. It can also be purchased on line at Friesen Press Online Bookstore, Amazon.com (with look inside submission), Apple iTunes/iBooks, and a number of bookstores as well as libraries in Canada.

Reading this book will be a way to remember things that should never happen again.

Foto van de Week: De Pier bij Scheveningen

Regelmatig vertel ik het verhaal achter een foto uit mijn collectie. Als je belangstelling voor een van deze foto’s hebt, mail mij dan even.

Deze keer gaat het over de iconische Pier bij Scheveningen. Het is een toeristische attractie en er zijn al veel foto’s van De Pier gemaakt. Elke keer wanneer ik in Den Haag ben ga ik naar Scheveningen om foto’s van die pier te maken, bij voorkeur bij zonsondergang. Hiernaast een foto genomen van de zuidkant. Iemand heeft deze foto als behang besteld bij Werk aan de Muur voor zijn of haar kantoor.

Wat speciaal aan deze foto is, is de reflectie van de wolken in het rustige water en de zachte kleuren van zonsondergang. Door de reflectie in het water en de meeuwen gaan de ogen van de kijker van dichtbij naar de verder gelegen pier en terug. De lege ruimte in het onderste deel van de foto geeft ook veel vrijheid aan de ogen. Daardoor verveelt de foto niet gauw.

De foto is in 2013 genomen met een Nikon D700 met de 16-35mm zoomlens: brandpunt 35mm en diafragma f/8; sluitertijd 1/320 en ISO 200. De snelle sluitertijd had ik nodig ivm de meeuwen en de golven. Inmiddels is het Reuzenrad erbij gebouwd (een Instagram-volger wees me daarop; was ik vergeten, is er al sinds 2016).

Hier een meer recentere foto genomen van de noordkant van De Pier met een mooie, rode, oranje zonsondergang. Deze foto is in 2019 genomen met een Nikon D800 met de 28-300mm zoomlens: brandpunt 78mm en diafragma f/6.3; sluitertijd 1/160 en ISO 100. De diepte is heel beperkt dus kon ik een groter diafragma gebruiken zodat de sensor voldoende licht zou krijgen. Ondanks het gebrek aan diepte ten opzichte van de eerste foto is het kleurenspel met De Pier en het Reuzenrad als silhouet boeiend voor het oog.

Misschien vind je het leuk om naar de vorige Foto’s van de Week te kijken. Je kunt onderstaande foto ook bij Werk aan de Muur kopen.

Bergen op Zoom during sunset

Sint Gertrudiskerk aan de Grote Markt

For a sad reason —the cremation of an aunt of mine— we traveled to Bergen op Zoom, the city of birth of my parents. At the same time it was nice to see the family again. To avoid early morning traffic jam we made the trip the day before. We stayed in Hotel Old Dutch in Bergen op Zoom, which is near the railway station. 

 
Last time we visited Bergen op Zoom, which was about a year ago, I only took pictures of Fortress De Roovere and none of the city center. So, we decided to stroll around a bit before having dinner. We left the hotel at a quarter to 6, all the shops were closed, there was hardly anybody in the streets and the sun was about to set. The clouds in the sky were turning warm yellow/gold and the buildings had a nice warm colour. 

At the main square, called Grote Markt, there is a really large church called St Gertrudiskerk. Walking through the Stationsstraat, the Wouwsestraat, and the Zuivelstraat we were heading for the Grote Markt. On the way we got a first glimpse of the church. Notice the colour of the sky.

Sint Gertrudiskerk

The Grote Markt was completely deserted so it was quite easy to take pictures from all sides of the square. Then we continued in the direction of the Gevangenpoort, where I took pictures from both the Lievevrouwestraat and the Rijkebuurtstraat (my mother was born and raised there). 

On the way back we visited the Markiezenhof, a city palace dating back to 1485. Here I missed my 16-35mm lens, I had only taken my 28-300mm lens. Therefore, I could not take a picture of the whole facade at once. Also, there were many cars in front of the building. So, I only shot the tower. A good reason to come back to the Markiezenhof again and get a tour with an official guide, which turns out to be a member of the family!

Markiezenhof during sunset

Just before going for dinner at Restorante Napoli I took the picture below, where you can see the top of the tower of De Maagd.

Former church De Maagd

All 11 pictures of Bergen op Zoom I submitted to Dreamstime were accepted, resulting in a total of 750+ pictures at Dreamstime.

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Bergkwartier and Uiterwaarden in Deventer

IJssel quay in Deventer

When coming from the west heading home — either by car or train — I everytime enjoy the beauty of the skyline of Deventer.

Last week I decided to take the train to Deventer for a walk through the old city and, of course, to take pictures. From the railway station I walked past the theater to the Brink, the main square of Deventer, a former Hanseatic city. Already on the way I saw some very nice buildings. 

The Brink was overwhelming. It was a nice sunny day around lunch time. All the terraces in the sun were crowded with people enjoying the early spring sun. 

I had selected the Bergkwartier en Brink audio tour on the izi.TRAVEL app to guide me in about an hour through the old city. It started at the Brink. The first picture I wanted to take was of the Waag, a very prominent building on the Brink, however, there were all kinds of trucks parked right in front of it. So, I skipped that. To be honest, this happened to me several times during this trip: always cars parked right in front of the most beautiful houses or churches. Still, I took some nice picture to grap the beauty of the old center.

 

As you can see, all these houses date back quite a long time. It was really interesting to hear about the individual history of these houses. For example, De Golden Vijzel used to be a farmacy. The next stop was the Saint Nicolas church, also called Bergkerk, with the two towers. Currently, it is used as exhibition center. Below two pictures of the Bergkerk: one on the outside and one on the inside.

Until quite recently there were still stables for horses in the center of Deventer. At Roggestraat 8 you can see one of these former stables.

Former stables

After finishing the tour I decided to go to the other side of the river IJssel to take pictures of  the quay of Deventer. So, I crossed the Wilhelmina bridge and walked north to the ferry stop to take the ferry back to Deventer. However, the sunny terrace of the Sandton IJsselhotel was quite inviting to have lunch. The pictures below (all accepted by Dreamstime) were taken from the bridge, the Uiterwaarden, the hotel (during lunch), and the ferry.

 

After lunch I returned by ferry to the center to visit the Lebuinus church from close by.

Saint Lebuinus Church

During this tour I used both the 16-35mm and the 28-300mm lens, and I used quite a bit of DoF to make sure that all relevant parts of the picture were sharp. For especially the wide-angle pictures I used the perspective correction Upright of Lightroom to get rid of the distortions of the wide-angle lens. As you can see, all pictures were taken during daytime. So, I still have to comeback for some night shots with a tripod! Maybe it is a good idea to stay the night at the Sandton IJsselhotel.😀

Here you will find all the pictures of Deventer accepted by Dreamstime.

Below you see my route through the old center of Deventer. As you can see the reception of the GPS on my iPhone X was not always strong enough.

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Tuindorp ‘t Lansink, a gemstone of Hengelo

Tuindorpbad

In the past Hengelo was mainly known for his metal industry. In the second half of the nineteenth century Charles Theodorus Stork started a plant to build machines in Hengelo. C.T. Stork, together with his sons, took the initiative to plan and to build the district Tuindorp ‘t Lansink —named after the farm ‘t Lansink— for the personnel of the Stork factorry.

The idea of C.T. Stork was to provide adequate housing and teaching, for his personnel and their families. Tuindorp was set up in such a way that would provide a good mix of houses for all personnel of Stork. The sons of C.T. Stork implemented his ideas —with the help of architect Karel Muller— in the first half of the twentieth century. Also personal development was regarded important, therefore they built, among other things, a school, a public library, and a kindergarten. In a way they were their time far ahead.

From a photographic point of view this district gives a nice mixture of old industrial buildings and well-kept houses. So, it was time for me to explore my home city. I used the WandeleninOverijssel app to guide me from the center of Hengelo and along the interesting places in Tuindorp.

Former Library Hengelo

The first stop was at the intersection of the Vondelstraat and the Jacob Catsstraat, where the former library of Hengelo was located. Anton Karel Beudt was the architect. Because of an argument between Stork and the city it was located outside Tuindorp. 

The second stop is at the Hazemeijer Hengelo (HH) complex between the two railway tracks from Hengelo to Almelo and from Hengelo to Zutphen. It is a beautiful industrial heritage of the Holec factory, which is now mainly used by creative industry companies.

Hazemeijer Hengelo, former factory of Holec

The third stop is at the C.T. Storkplein, for me one of the most beautiful squares in Tuindorp and in Hengelo. I come here every now and then to have dinner at Hotel ‘t Lansink, a Michelin star restaurant. Especially during summer, it is nice to have a late-night dinner on the balcony, overlooking the square. 

Hotel ‘t Lansink in Tuindorp

From there on I walked along the small pond called the Tuindorpbad. The pond originated to obtain the necessary sand for the construction of the houses. Part of the pond is still a public swimming pool —also founded by Stork—, with water of excellent quality due to an underground spring. The buildings of the swimming pool are part of the cultural heritage of Tuindorp. I come here every week for my yoga classes and always enjoy the view. 

Swimming pool Tuindorpbad

The area around the Tuindorpbad is really magnificent: the pond, the eminent trees, and the houses; a peaceful place to be.

Water Tower of Stork

From there, via De Gieterij (now the ROC School of Twente), the Water Tower of Stork, the HEIM museum located in the former factory school for Stork personnel, back to the center of Hengelo.

I actually visited Tuindorp several times. During these occasions I used the 16-35mm and the 28-300mm lenses. For the pictures taken with the wide-angle lens I corrected the perspective correction Upright of Lightroom to obtain vertical lines for the walls of buildings. 

 

Below you see the original route.

 
A couple of days later I took pictures of the Verenigingsgebouw Stork, which is part of the cultural heritage of C.T. Stork. 

Verenigingsgebouw Stork

Here you see all my pictures of Hengelo accepted by Dreamstime (larger and better quality).

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Exploring an unknown neighborhood in Utrecht

River Vecht meets Stadsbuitensingel

Recently we visited friends in Utrecht, close to the northern part of the Stadsbuitensingel, a canal almost completely surrounding the center of Utrecht. Popular walking tours never took me to this neighborhood. So, I decided to come back another day during daytime and with my camera.

I travelled to Utrecht the day before I had to chair a day-long meeting. So, I took my Peak Design Travel Backpack 45L to carry my clothes (in a medium packing cube), wash pouch, my camera plus 28-300mm lens in a small camera cube, and my iPad Pro for making notes. There was plenty of room left, so I could easily shrink the backpack to 30L. 


 
From the railway station I walked to the place where the river Vecht meets the Stadsbuitengracht, which is near the Weerdsluis (a water lock). It was late afternoon when I arrived at the Nieuwekade. I noticed the soft sun shining on the white houses on the Weerdsingel Westzijde, so I immediately walked to the Bemuurde Weerd Oostzijde, where I could step down to the water level to also capture the reflection of the houses in the water. At the top of the post the resulting picture. Notice the balance between the first tree and the white house at the corner. It still required some processing because the houses on the right were a bit too dark compared to the white houses hit directly by the  sun. 

From there I walked to the Begijnekade via Van Asch van Wijckskade to take the picture below.

Weerdsingel Oostzijde

And from there to the continuation of the Begijnekade, crossing a small parking lot to get closer to the water, where you can see the continuation of the Stadsbuitensingel

Weerdsingel Oostzijde

These pictures also need to extra processing. The sunlight was already soft, however, I added some extra warmth in it.

After this walk and taking so many nice pictures I will never forget this part of Utrecht. After that, back to the hotel to prepare for next-day’s meeting. I really enjoyed the walk, taking the pictures, processing them, and getting them accepted by Dreamstime.

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Discovering Almelo beyond my bias

Although we have lived for more than 30 years in Twente we never visited the center of Almelo, besides of course the theater. Recently we shared our lack of interest in the city Almelo with friends, and realized that we actually never visited the center of Almelo (besides the theater of course). Pure coincidental, the next day it was a perfect day for a city tour, so we decided to go to Almelo.

Using the app WandeleninOverijssel we took the cultural heritage tour and walked from the railway station to the City Hall of Almelo, the Court of Justice, and the harbour. Mainly modern buildings.  A bluish area, a lot of blue buildings. 

City Hall Almelo

From there to the city center, which is really a cultural heritage area. Some of the buildings date back more than 3 centuries. And there is quite a variety: huge churches, tiny houses, and extravagant houses.

Grote Kerk seen from the Herengracht

Very special is Huize Almelo, which is a Havezathe. It is still inhabited.

House Almelo

It was a quite enjoyable walk through the history of Almelo, resulting in a very positive image of Almelo. Although we realised that quite a few shops were vacant. We will definitely return. On Komoot I share our route and the pictures I took with both my iPhone X and my full frame camera. Here you can see all the pictures of Almelo accepted by Dreamstime. All pictures were taken with a 16-35mm lens. Below you see the route we took.


 

Halfway we stopped at De Zoete Bezigheid to have coffee and something special. A nice place to visit!

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Stormy weather on Dutch coast

Waves during storm at Scheveningen

For business reasons I had to go to a meeting early in the morning in The Hague. So, I decided to go the day before. As it turned out, a heavy western storm was expected for that day. A reason the more to leave for Scheveningen earlier than originally planned.

When I arrived at the boulevard in Scheveningen near the pier, I realized how strong the storm was (8+ Bft). There were just a few people on the beach and I could not see any boats.  The waves were impressive for Dutch standards. 

Pier at Scheveningen

First I took some shots of the pier, with the waves splashing against the supporting pillars. It turns out that there was a lot of foam, so in seconds my camera and my lens were covered with the remains of foam. So, I decided to go to the upperdeck of the pier. 

Waves splashing against supporting pillars

Looking at my pictures I noticed a couple of things. The power of the sea, the wind pushing me away all the time, the sounds was lacking in my pictures. Therefore, I made a couple of videos with my iPhone. Below you see one of them.

They look much better, however, it still looks like a storm in a glass of water, in a confined, shallow frame. Also, zooming in both with the camera and the iPhone compresses the whole scene, making it very shallow. So, it does not give the feeling of being part of it.

Waves during stormy weather

To experiment, I went to the front of the pier to take a picture where the water below me and the horizon were sharp (wide angle and large depth-of-field). Here it was really stormy and the wind was really unpredictable, my camera was shaking in all directions (fast shutter speed). Because of all this I chose for zoomlens at 28mm, aperture f/9, shutter speed 1/640sec, and ISO 320. It gives you a better feeling of being part of it. 

Wide-angle view of the incoming waves

At home, I was a bit disappointed in the raw pictures: too white, no contrast, and too flat. So, I did quite a bit of processing: added a bit of light, added a lot of contrast, lowered the highlights a bit, added a lot of black, and added some blue, and sharpened the image. You can see the result in the one above. 

“Het Oerd” on Ameland

Beach near lighthouse

It seems that this year the islands in the Waddenzee are my favourite holiday destination. After Vlieland (twice) and Terschelling, we visited Ameland together with friends. After arrival we picked up our bikes (regular bikes). It turned out that our friends had hired e-bikes, so after the first day —we took a ride through the hilly dunes—we changed our regular bikes for e-bikes as well. Ameland with its magnificent dunes is hilly and it is of course always windy. A good reason to hire e-bikes. 

The second day we explored by bike the western part of Ameland: the dunes along the North Sea, the beach near the lighthouse (some of us went swimming), the village Hollum, and the tidal mud flat (“Het Wad”) on the southern side. 

The tidal mud flat, called “Het Wad”

The third day we walked along the North Sea beach, where we enjoyed the cloudy scenery: ranging from white to dark grey clouds with a deep blue sky. Really beautiful. After the hike we took the bike to the village Buren to have lunch.

Clouds above the North Sea

The last day we went to an area called “Het Oerd”, which is on the eastern side of the island. We biked all the way to the “Oerdblinkert”, which is the highest dune (+24 meters). Below are all the pictures I took at Ameland that are accepted by Dreamstime.

 

Our dinner highlight was Het Witte Paard in Nes, a cousy restaurant that serves excellent food.

Before going to the islands I thought they would all be more or less the same. Nothing could be further from the truth. After this week, Ameland has become one of my favourite islands. 

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