Bergkwartier and Uiterwaarden in Deventer

IJssel quay in Deventer

When coming from the west heading home — either by car or train — I everytime enjoy the beauty of the skyline of Deventer.

Last week I decided to take the train to Deventer for a walk through the old city and, of course, to take pictures. From the railway station I walked past the theater to the Brink, the main square of Deventer, a former Hanseatic city. Already on the way I saw some very nice buildings. 

The Brink was overwhelming. It was a nice sunny day around lunch time. All the terraces in the sun were crowded with people enjoying the early spring sun. 

I had selected the Bergkwartier en Brink audio tour on the izi.TRAVEL app to guide me in about an hour through the old city. It started at the Brink. The first picture I wanted to take was of the Waag, a very prominent building on the Brink, however, there were all kinds of trucks parked right in front of it. So, I skipped that. To be honest, this happened to me several times during this trip: always cars parked right in front of the most beautiful houses or churches. Still, I took some nice picture to grap the beauty of the old center.

As you can see, all these houses date back quite a long time. It was really interesting to hear about the individual history of these houses. For example, De Golden Vijzel used to be a farmacy. The next stop was the Saint Nicolas church, also called Bergkerk, with the two towers. Currently, it is used as exhibition center. Below two pictures of the Bergkerk: one on the outside and one on the inside.

Until quite recently there were still stables for horses in the center of Deventer. At Roggestraat 8 you can see one of these former stables.

Former stables

After finishing the tour I decided to go to the other side of the river IJssel to take pictures of  the quay of Deventer. So, I crossed the Wilhelmina bridge and walked north to the ferry stop to take the ferry back to Deventer. However, the sunny terrace of the Sandton IJsselhotel was quite inviting to have lunch. The pictures below (all accepted by Dreamstime) were taken from the bridge, the Uiterwaarden, the hotel (during lunch), and the ferry.

After lunch I returned by ferry to the center to visit the Lebuinus church from close by.

Saint Lebuinus Church

During this tour I used both the 16-35mm and the 28-300mm lens, and I used quite a bit of DoF to make sure that all relevant parts of the picture were sharp. For especially the wide-angle pictures I used the perspective correction Upright of Lightroom to get rid of the distortions of the wide-angle lens. As you can see, all pictures were taken during daytime. So, I still have to comeback for some night shots with a tripod! Maybe it is a good idea to stay the night at the Sandton IJsselhotel.😀

Here you will find all the pictures of Deventer accepted by Dreamstime.

Below you see my route through the old center of Deventer. As you can see the reception of the GPS on my iPhone X was not always strong enough.

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Tuindorp ‘t Lansink, a gemstone of Hengelo

Tuindorpbad

In the past Hengelo was mainly known for his metal industry. In the second half of the nineteenth century Charles Theodorus Stork started a plant to build machines in Hengelo. C.T. Stork, together with his sons, took the initiative to plan and to build the district Tuindorp ‘t Lansink —named after the farm ‘t Lansink— for the personnel of the Stork factorry.

The idea of C.T. Stork was to provide adequate housing and teaching, for his personnel and their families. Tuindorp was set up in such a way that would provide a good mix of houses for all personnel of Stork. The sons of C.T. Stork implemented his ideas —with the help of architect Karel Muller— in the first half of the twentieth century. Also personal development was regarded important, therefore they built, among other things, a school, a public library, and a kindergarten. In a way they were their time far ahead.

From a photographic point of view this district gives a nice mixture of old industrial buildings and well-kept houses. So, it was time for me to explore my home city. I used the WandeleninOverijssel app to guide me from the center of Hengelo and along the interesting places in Tuindorp.

Former Library Hengelo

The first stop was at the intersection of the Vondelstraat and the Jacob Catsstraat, where the former library of Hengelo was located. Anton Karel Beudt was the architect. Because of an argument between Stork and the city it was located outside Tuindorp. 

The second stop is at the Hazemeijer Hengelo (HH) complex between the two railway tracks from Hengelo to Almelo and from Hengelo to Zutphen. It is a beautiful industrial heritage of the Holec factory, which is now mainly used by creative industry companies.

Hazemeijer Hengelo, former factory of Holec

The third stop is at the C.T. Storkplein, for me one of the most beautiful squares in Tuindorp and in Hengelo. I come here every now and then to have dinner at Hotel ‘t Lansink, a Michelin star restaurant. Especially during summer, it is nice to have a late-night dinner on the balcony, overlooking the square. 

Hotel ‘t Lansink in Tuindorp

From there on I walked along the small pond called the Tuindorpbad. The pond originated to obtain the necessary sand for the construction of the houses. Part of the pond is still a public swimming pool —also founded by Stork—, with water of excellent quality due to an underground spring. The buildings of the swimming pool are part of the cultural heritage of Tuindorp. I come here every week for my yoga classes and always enjoy the view. 

Swimming pool Tuindorpbad

The area around the Tuindorpbad is really magnificent: the pond, the eminent trees, and the houses; a peaceful place to be.

Water Tower of Stork

From there, via De Gieterij (now the ROC School of Twente), the Water Tower of Stork, the HEIM museum located in the former factory school for Stork personnel, back to the center of Hengelo.

I actually visited Tuindorp several times. During these occasions I used the 16-35mm and the 28-300mm lenses. For the pictures taken with the wide-angle lens I corrected the perspective correction Upright of Lightroom to obtain vertical lines for the walls of buildings. 

 

Below you see the original route.

 

Here you see all my pictures of Hengelo accepted by Dreamstime (larger and better quality).

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Exploring an unknown neighborhood in Utrecht

River Vecht meets Stadsbuitensingel

Recently we visited friends in Utrecht, close to the northern part of the Stadsbuitensingel, a canal almost completely surrounding the center of Utrecht. Popular walking tours never took me to this neighborhood. So, I decided to come back another day during daytime and with my camera.

I travelled to Utrecht the day before I had to chair a day-long meeting. So, I took my Peak Design Travel Backpack 45L to carry my clothes (in a medium packing cube), wash pouch, my camera plus 28-300mm lens in a small camera cube, and my iPad Pro for making notes. There was plenty of room left, so I could easily shrink the backpack to 30L. 


 
From the railway station I walked to the place where the river Vecht meets the Stadsbuitengracht, which is near the Weerdsluis (a water lock). It was late afternoon when I arrived at the Nieuwekade. I noticed the soft sun shining on the white houses on the Weerdsingel Westzijde, so I immediately walked to the Bemuurde Weerd Oostzijde, where I could step down to the water level to also capture the reflection of the houses in the water. At the top of the post the resulting picture. Notice the balance between the first tree and the white house at the corner. It still required some processing because the houses on the right were a bit too dark compared to the white houses hit directly by the  sun. 

From there I walked to the Begijnekade via Van Asch van Wijckskade to take the picture below.

Weerdsingel Oostzijde

And from there to the continuation of the Begijnekade, crossing a small parking lot to get closer to the water, where you can see the continuation of the Stadsbuitensingel

Weerdsingel Oostzijde

These pictures also need to extra processing. The sunlight was already soft, however, I added some extra warmth in it.

After this walk and taking so many nice pictures I will never forget this part of Utrecht. After that, back to the hotel to prepare for next-day’s meeting. I really enjoyed the walk, taking the pictures, processing them, and getting them accepted by Dreamstime.

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Discovering Almelo beyond my bias

Although we have lived for more than 30 years in Twente we never visited the center of Almelo, besides of course the theater. Recently we shared our lack of interest in the city Almelo with friends, and realized that we actually never visited the center of Almelo (besides the theater of course). Pure coincidental, the next day it was a perfect day for a city tour, so we decided to go to Almelo.

Using the app WandeleninOverijssel we took the cultural heritage tour and walked from the railway station to the City Hall of Almelo, the Court of Justice, and the harbour. Mainly modern buildings.  A bluish area, a lot of blue buildings. 

City Hall Almelo

From there to the city center, which is really a cultural heritage area. Some of the buildings date back more than 3 centuries. And there is quite a variety: huge churches, tiny houses, and extravagant houses.

Grote Kerk seen from the Herengracht

Very special is Huize Almelo, which is a Havezathe. It is still inhabited.

House Almelo

It was a quite enjoyable walk through the history of Almelo, resulting in a very positive image of Almelo. Although we realised that quite a few shops were vacant. We will definitely return. On Komoot I share our route and the pictures I took with both my iPhone X and my full frame camera. Here you can see all the pictures of Almelo accepted by Dreamstime. All pictures were taken with a 16-35mm lens. Below you see the route we took.


 

Halfway we stopped at De Zoete Bezigheid to have coffee and something special. A nice place to visit!

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Overwhelming Granada

After Cordoba our next stop during our trip through Andalusia was Granada. Our hotel was in Albaycin, known as the Muslim quarter, and just as Alhambra on the list of World Heritage of UNESCO. It still has its original narrow and winding streets going all the way up to the top of San Nicolas. The taxi that took us to our hotel barely fitted the narrow streets.

The first thing we did was walk down to the Rio Darro passing through Albaycin to enjoy the view of the magnificent Alhambra.

Nasrid Palaces and Alcazaba, Alhambra and Albaicin, Granada
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

It is really impressive to see the Nasrid Palace, the Palace of Charles V, and Alcazaba, the fortress of Alhambra, being the oldest part of Alhambra.

Get your tickets via Internet as soon as possible. If you try to arrange it on the spot, it may happen that only awkward times are available. Our timeslot was a couple of days ahead at the end of the day. So, we first visited the Museum of Sacromonte Caves. It exhibits the way people lived in caves and also discusses the link with flamenco.

Museum Sacromonte Caves

Here are some pictures of Albaycin we took during our strolls through the narrow, winding streets going from one church to the next mirador.

Our next visit was the part of Alhambra for which no tickets are needed, for example the Palace of Charles V.  It is a very dominant, square building which stands right in front of the entrance of the Nasrid Palace. On the outside it looks like a solid cubic building filled with a lot of rooms. To our surprise the middle is a huge open circular space.

Circular patio in Palace Charles V

One evening I tried to take a nightspot of Alhambra. So, we went to Mirador San Nicolas. I was not the only one. Even using the tripod was not enough. The exposure times were long and there were a lot of people walking around me. The picture taken was my iPhone X came out slightly better.

Alhambra by night

The next day we visited Generalife, Alcazaba, and Nasrid Palace. Generalife is a kind of summer palace with beautiful gardens, patios, terraces, and fountains. A real joy to just walk around and enjoy the beauty.

Patio of the irrigation ditch of Generalife, Alhambra
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

The Alcazaba forms the oldest part of Alhambra and is a two-towered fortress. It was used to defend the region.

Alcazaba, fortress of Alhambra, Granada
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

Standing in line to visit the Nasrid Palace, I realised that we were about to enter something special. So many people, specific time slots for entering, and very strict guardians, especially regarding backpacks. 

Entrance Nasrid Palace

Although you get the feeling that you are entering the palace from the rear door, you immediately get overwhelmed by the beauty of the walls, the ceilings, the patios, the Lion fountain. Everywhere you look you see impressive art work showing a very high level of knowledge of science and technology. The beauty really overwhelms you. Here are some really beautiful pictures of the Nasrid Palace.

The last attraction in Granada we visited was the Cathedral. Below a view of the Cathedral and the city from Alcazaba.

Aerial view of Granada Cathedral and city of Granada
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

It is an impressive cathedral with huge pillars and beautiful ceilings. In the pictures I mainly concentrated on the lines of the pillars and the curves of the ceiling.

Granada — staying in Albayzin, visiting Alhambra, strolling around in the city — really overwhelmed us. It is definitely a place to visit over and over again.

Here are all the pictures of Alhambra accepted by Dreamstime at Flickr.

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Visiting Elx and discovering palm trees

 

During our stay in Alicante we visited some surrounding cities, one of them was Elx or Elche. Via Santa Pola we took the bus to Elx.

Municipal Park Elx

Without a specific plan we walked to a major park close by. It turned out to be the Municipal Park, where I found the amphitheater, and in the rear a pigeon tower.

Amphitheater and Pigeon Tower in Elx
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

After that we took a tour through the city by tourism miniature train. During this tour we found out what Elx is famous for: palm trees. During the Arabic reign of Spain these palm trees were imported. It is estimated that currently there are 200,000 to 300,000 palm trees in the area of Elx. It is really unique in Europe to have so many palm trees together. In November 2000, Elx was elected the UNESCO Cultural Heritage Site.

Botanic garden Huerto del Cura in Elx
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

Then we decided to continue our discovery of Elx by going to the botanic garden called Huerto del Cura (garden of the priest), located in the older parts of Elx. It is a relative small orchard, however, packed with many exclusive palm trees, cactus, and other plants. I took quite a few pictures there, which you can find below and here. Some of these pictures were taken in Manual mode, like the one below, because there was not enough light to work with Aperture mode, resulting in a slightly higher ISO.

Cactus in Huerto del Cura

During a break I also managed to take a picture of the Basilica of Elx. Although it was not the right time of the day because of the very bright sun coming from the right. I wanted to take a picture standing more on the left of the church, however, this was impossible because  of the overwhelming sun behind the tower. So, I had to settle for this one.

Basilica Saint Mary in Elx
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

Late in the afternoon we had an excellent lunch in an Italian restaurant called Ristorante Gourmet. Looking back, Elx gave us a lot more than we expected. It is definitely worthwhile to visit.

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Strolling through the streets of Alicante

Harbour of Alicante in Spain
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

Alicante is a nice Mediterranean port on the east coast of Spain. From The Santa Barbara Castle you have a nice view of the harbour and the city. Walking down from the castle you end up in a mesh of very narrow streets and squares, going up and down stairs. It is a beautiful part of the old city.

Calle San Rafael in Alicante
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

It is a very colourful neighbourhood with lots of red, blue, and yellow. And, of course,  many plants. 

Blue in the streets of Alicante

It is wonderful to stroll through these colourful streets of Alicante and taste the history and the Arab influences (the palmtree is just an example). Enjoy the pictures of the streets of Alicante.

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Fallas in Valencia

Fallas Valencia 2018
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

My wife told me to put Fallas in Valencia on my bucket list. So, this year we decided to participate in this festivity. The origin of the Fallas is the commemoration of Saint Joseph. The word Fallas both refers to the event and to the structures they build. The event  is really a community festivity for the whole family. 
Every day during Fallas at the Plaza del Ayuntamiento there is La Mascletà (video of La Mascletà). For five minutes there is an explosion of very loud sound; you can physically feel the vibrations going through  your body. To be close to the fireworks you have to be on time (at least one and a half hour in advance). 
Every neighbourhood builds it own Falla. So, walking through the city you will find many Fallas, which mostly consist of one main “doll” surrounded by many smaller ones, often expressing national or international political issues, for example, sources of fake news.

Sources of fake news

At the top of this post the Falla that had a very prominent position at the Plaza del Ayuntamiento. Below one that received a lot of prizes. 

Prize winning Falla

Another activity is the parade of Valencians dressed in folkloric costumes to take flowers to the Virgin Mary (video L’Ofrena de flors) at Plaza de la Reina. On the way going there we met this beautifully dressed lady being very proud to wear her folkloric costume.

Fallera

After sunset the streets near the Fallas are beautifully lighted, often with live music, places to have a drink or take a bite. 

Lights in the evening

After midnight the day ends with a spectacular fireworks. Fallas in Valencia is another check on my bucket list. 
Many more pictures and videos were taken with my iPhone X, except for the top one, this was taken with my Nikon D800.

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Santa Barbara Castle in Alicante

Downtown Alicante
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

To celebrate my retirement as full professor at the university we decided to visit Alicante and Valencia. In this post I will focus on the view from Mount Benacantil and in the next ones on other parts of Alicante and its surrounding cities and on Valencia (Fallas!). Although not intended as a photography trip I selected 21 pictures which are all accepted by Dreamstime.
The first thing we did was to visit the Santa Barbara Castle. Originally founded by the Arabs, it was conquered by the Spanish on the feast of Saint Barbara. Explaining the name of the castle. It stands on the Mount Benacantil (166m) and from there you have a nice overview of Alicante and the beach. Above you see the colourful buildings in downtown Alicante in the neighbourhood of the Co-cathedral of Saint Nicolas of Bari (100mm).
Center of Alicante
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

View on Cape de l`Horta in Alicante
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

Above a much wider view of the center of Alicante and  its harbour and Cape de l’Horta on the north side of Alicante.
In an old fortress it is always nice to play with shapes. Here an example of a perspective of Cape de l’Horta through a small gate. It took some time before all tourists were out of sight. 
View on Cape de l`Horta in Alicante
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

All pictures were taken with a Nikon D800 and the general-purpose zoomlens (28-300mm). Here you will find all 21 pictures of my Alicante trip accepted by Dreamstime. In processing the pictures I added quite a bit of vibrance and saturation. Because of the slightly clouded weather the pictures looked kind of bleak. 
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Rotterdam Central Station

The Dutch Railways realises that railway stations form an important part of the center of cities. I guess that is one of the reasons that the architecture of the railway stations is regarded as extremely important. Rotterdam Central Station is no exception. It was officially opened in March 2014. A year later I took this picture.

Central Station Rotterdam
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

It is one of my best selling pictures, especially in 2015. The most recent sales was this week. Below the original picture, it was taken with my Nikkor 16-35mm lens (settings: 16mm, f/4, 1/400sec, ISO 100). Especially, the wide-angle setting gives the pointy shape of the building special attention. 
Rotterdam Central Station: original picture

As you can see, I did quite a bit of post-processing:

  • The diagonal roof line is an essential characteristic of the building, so I cropped the picture to map the roof line close to the diagonal line of the picture. It makes the picture a lot stronger. The additional advantage was that I got rid of the glass building on the right (it distracts).
  • As you can imagine, I took a lot of pictures of this building. In the end, I chose the one with the person in front. It gives depth and it leads your eyes to switch between the shape of the station and him.
  • Last, I made the picture more lively: blue sky and yellow in the building. Especially the diagonal roof lost its color because of various shadows. 

Also inside it is a nice building, definitely worthwhile to pay a visit.

Central Station Rotterdam
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

Rotterdam is famous for its architectural innovations. Here you will find more pictures of Rotterdam and here a post about it. Enjoy!
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