Sunset at Noordwijk aan Zee

The colourful sky is one of the most fascinating scenes to take a picture of. Quite often people start to shoot too early, resulting in a very dominating orange ball called the sun. I prefer to start when the sun is almost disappearing behind the horizon. Then the sky and the sun are in balance and the clouds in the sky get an orange backlight.

Sunset North Sea, the Netherlands
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

The above picture was taken at roughly 22:00 hours at the end of May along the coast of Noordwijk aan Zee, the Netherlands. Right at the time of the sunset. Just a few minutes later the sun had completely disappeared. 
What makes this picture special is of course the shape of the clouds and the way they are lighted. Some are dark and others are orange backlighted. Also the texture of the clouds adds to the special atmosphere of the evening. Furthermore, there is a subtle orange glow on the water. 
The picture was taken with the zoomlens set at 28mm, shutter speed 1/80th of a second, aperture f/5, and ISO 100. Below you see the unprocessed NEF version. It is not very appealing.
NEF version of sunset

In Adobe Lightroom 6 I did the following:

  • Lightroom automatically set the  temperature to 4900 (I did not change it)
  • set the correction profile for the lens I used (Nikkor 28-300mm)
  • set liveliness to +68
  • set saturation to +2
  • set the horizon straight
  • decreased locally the highlight caused by the sun.

The rest remained the same. This makes the picture much more appealing without overdoing is. It is important to only make subtle changes.
Here you will find more of my photo albums. If you are interested in having this picture on canvas, please click here.
The picture got accepted by Dreamstime within 2 days. 
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Sunset at Domburg

Domburg is a tiny village along the coast in the province Zeeland in the Netherlands. I had been there when I was young. My family decided to pay this touristic village a visit again. It was very nice weather. So, we had ample opportunity to have long hikes on the beach. 
To make sure that the sand of the beach does not disappear they have built breakers.  These are two rows of wooden poles from the coast into the sea, covering the area between high and low tide. These are fascinating objects to take pictures of, because of the water curling around the poles and the seagulls taking a rest.

Breakers at Domburg
Breakers at Domburg

Breakers at Domburg
Breakers at Domburg

Around 7 pm it was high tide; around the same time we also enjoyed a beautiful sunset. The interaction between the remaining light of the sun, its reflection on the water,  and the incoming waves of the upcoming tide were really magnificent.
Sunset at Domburg
Sunset at Domburg

 I had taken my regular lens: Nikkor 28 – 300mm lens. To make sure that I had full control over the exposure I shot in manual mode: shutter speed 1/320th of a second (to avoid a tripod and fix the waves) and aperture f/9. The under-exposure was compensated by an automatic increase of the ISO. Looking back now an aperture of f/11 would have been better (larger depth of field).
Here are some more pictures of the beautiful sunset in Domburg. Enjoy!
 

A peaceful Huascarán during sunset

Snow-capped Huascaran during sunset
© Peter Apers | Dreamstime Stock Photos

At the end of the day, while making a tour north of Huaraz (Peru), we visited Yungay. In 1970 a major earthquake took place there. It is know as the Great Peruvian earthquake. It caused an enormous landslide with roughly 70000 casualties.  The people were trapped and did not know where to go: the noise of the landslide reflected against the surrounding mountains giving the impression that the landslide was coming from everywhere.
While trying to grasp the size of the landslide, the Huascarán, one of the highest mountains of Peru, started to glow. Due to the sunset the light was getting warmer, making the snow-capped mountain glow.
Huscarán during sunset
Huscarán during sunset

As a photographer this immediately attracted my attention. Also knowing that the sunset in Peru lasts less than in the Netherlands. Every minute the light and the clouds were different. So, I continued making pictures with different compositions with the warm glowing Huascarán in the background.
Church built on top of landslide
Church built on top of remains of landslide

Then suddenly, like somebody switched off the light, all the warm colors were gone. The only thing that remains is a harsh looking, grayish mountain from where the landslide came. Suddenly, I realized the enormous impact the landslide had.
Here you can see more pictures of the Huascarán. One of my colleague-contributor of Dreamstime added me as his/her favorite photographer based on the top picture.
Huascaran after sunset
Huascarán after sunset

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